Skip to main content

[Video] Can Policy Help Create Incentives in the Cybersecurity Marketplace

Hosted by Greater Washington DC Chapter of the Internet Society

Panelists
Olaf Kolkman – Chief Internet Technology Officer, The Internet Society
Tom Gann – Government Affairs Lead, McAfee
Jeff Greene - Senior Director, Global Government Affairs and Policy, Symantec
Aarti Soni - Senior Vice President Cyber Claims Advocacy Leader, Marsh
Moderated by Ari Schwartz - Managing Director of Cybersecurity Services, Venable



How does policy impact evolution and innovation of cybersecurity markets and the tech sector?
How can technology, standards-setting, and policy narrow the scope of risk within which cyber defenders operate?
How can policy, markets, and the tech sector help to create the incentives necessary to enhance the security of the Internet?
The Internet has become critical infrastructure and 20 billion devices are expected to be connected by 2020. As the Internet grows, cyber threats have increased alarmingly in number and in scope, threatening every sector of the economy and society and defending the Internet against cyber attacks is one of the great challenges of our time. However, there is no consensus on how to build meaningful cybersecurity into our complex Internet ecosystem. Direct regulation has largely been rejected as too heavy-handed and damaging to innovation. Although there is a growing insurance market to cover the costs of cyber breaches, liability has not been applied to software vendors and has not taken root in the legal system even as industry standardization bodies move slowly in this direction. Existing incentive patterns make disclosure of breaches haphazard at best.
Economic and business incentives, whether through industry self-regulation or government action, may be the most effective mechanism. Such incentives could reduce the risk faced by network and IT system security specialists. Our distinguished panelists will examine what incentives currently exist and what their impact has been, as well as the question of where incentives should emanate from: Industry self-regulation? Public-private partnerships? Government regulation? Or some combination of these? What would be the most effective strategy? Which are easy to put in place and which the most difficult?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Chapelton v Barry UDC (Exclusion Clauses)

Mr Chapelton went to a beach run by Barry UDC. See saw deckchairs. A notice next to them said,
"Barry Urban District Council. Cold Knap. Hire of chairs 2d. per session of 3 hours ... tickets should be obtained from attendants."  He got two chairs from an attendant, paid the money and got two tickets. He put them in his pocket. On the ticket was written,
"Available for three hours. Time expires where indicated by cut-off and should be retained and shown on request. The council will not be liable for any accident or damage arising from the hire of the chair."  When he sat on the chair it gave way and he was injured. Would the exemption clause work? The Court of Appeal held that Barry UDC made an offer when the chairs were on display, Mr Chapelton accepted when he picked up the chairs from the defendant, and the ticket was merely a receipt of the contract, so the exclusion clause could not be incorporated as a term, because it was too late.

A Picture Speaks a Thousand Words to Show Lee Kuan Yew's Impact on Singapore Economy

He led the team that turned mudflats into a metropolis, but could one graphic describe the impact that the late Mr Lee Kuan Yew had on Singapore? This one from the Economist does a pretty good job of representing it.

The underlying philosophy of the Visual Law School site is that complex issues and concepts (such as the law and legal principles) can be made more understandable by showing them in a visual or graphical format. This infographic will not replace the reams of text and hours of eulogies that will mark the life and impact the Mr Lee had on our country. But it is a relatively fair and balanced window into the story that helps to put that impact into a global and historical perspective. Read the full article at The Economist
Rest in Peace, Mr Lee, we will always be grateful for what you did.

Lim Geok Hian v Lim Guan Chin (Misrepresentation)

Lim Geok Hian (brother) convinced his sister Lim Guan Chin to sign a contract that : if their father bequeathed the family home to either of them, they would share the home equally instead. Actually, Lim Geok Hian already knew that his father had written a will bequeathing the entire house to Lim Guan Chin. But he expressedly or impliedly represented to her that it was likely that he would inherit the house. When the father died, Lim Geok Hian tried to enforce the contract. The Court of Appeal affirmed that since his sister was induced by the fraudulent misrepresentation to sign the contract, it could be set aside